SOTA

SOTA is an awards programme that is aimed at radio amateurs who want to combine operating amateur radio with walking in the hills and mountains.

I first started with SOTA in August 2016 when one day I heard someone calling “CQ SOTA” from the top of Walbury hill.  I had heard of SOTA but had never really got around to investigating so I answered the call and from that moment on I was hooked.

I found the main SOTA web site at www.sota.org.uk and started reading.  Once I had registered I was able to log my first chaser contact and so gain my first point.  Only 999 more needed to get my first award.

In 2017 I started a programme of hill fitness training in anticipation of trying to activate a few summits.  Below you will find a few posts relating my progress.

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Tryfan 2018

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GW/NW-006, Tryfan – 918m, 8 Points

Day two of our Snowdonia excursion.  The plan was to climb Tryfan then on up Bristly Ridge onto the Glyders to bag Glyder Fawr and possibly on also to Y Garn before descending back down via the Devils Kitchen.  A classic Glyders circuit.  Unfortunately the weather was against us so we only managed to complete Tryfan, details below.

Still wet from the previous day we set off from the car park at Llyn Ogwen up the classic north face route.  It was pretty much as expected, another new variation although there were a few bits I recognised.  We found the Cannon Stone but it was too windy to climb aboard.  From the Cannon Stone we missed the main route up and ended up climbing the chimney under the chock stone which is always good fun.  We reached the top and felt the full fury of the wind.  At times the gusts were strong enough to knock me over so we went for a rapid activation from the whip antenna.  Fortunately we soon made the required four contacts and were able to get off the summit in a controlled manner rather than being blown off.  Needless to say we didn’t try the leap of faith, I think if we had we would have landed some distance below on a gust of wind.  Maybe next time.

GW/NW-006 Log

Once off the summit we reviewed the situation and in light of the forecast for the winds to increase significantly over the next few hours we decided against attempting the grade one scramble up Bristly Ridge, instead we turned east to take the low route back up to the road and an early finish.

Journey Details

Date – 2nd December 2018

Postcode – LL24 0EU

Parking – SH 661 602

Radio – Kenwood TH-D74

Antenna – Nagoya NA771

Band – 144 FM

Contacts – 4

SOTA points – 8 + 3 bonus

Group – Myself & Peter

Walking Route Summary

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Y Lliwedd, Snowdon & Yr Aran

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1st Dec and it’s winter bonus season again.  Decided to head up the A5 to North Wales for a weekend in Snowdonia.  Weather was at least not cold but forecast wet and windy.  It didn’t disappoint.

Last year we did Snowdon from the east up the Pyg track so this year we decided to try the southern approach via Watkins.  This gave us the opportunity to add Yr Aran on the return leg.

GW/NW-008, Y Lliwedd – 898m, 8 Points

 

First summit of the day was Y Lliwedd.  This was the first time I have used the Watkins path, I wasn’t disappointed.  Viability was not great but still it was a pleasant approach.  Compared with the other Snowdon routes this one was quite quiet.  We saw one large party set off just before us but we soon passed them and had the mountain to ourselves.

We stopped for a moment at Gladstones rock to reflect a little on the history of this route.  At least I think it was this one, there are a lot of rocks on this path.

The final push up to the summit of Y Lliwedd is always an interesting climb.  The path is a bit like the mountain mists!  There are two summit peaks, east and west, both are in the activation zone so either will do.  This year we operated from the slightly higher West Peak as we would be turning around to head back up to Snowdon once finished.  As we approached the summit we could hear people on the calling channel so didn’t set up the beam but managed to work enough contacts using the Nagoya whip.

GW/NW-008 Log

GW/NW-001, Snowdon – Yr Wyddfa – 1085m, 10 Points

From Y Lliwedd we dropped back down to the Bwlch to pick up the top end of the Watkins again and continue up onto the main summit.  I have walked this route a few times in the other direction and always struggled to find the correct route.  This was the first time I had walked it in this directions so I had high hopes that I might be able to find the proper path up.  It was not to be though, we turned up too soon and ended up emerging right by the upper station building much to our surprise.

The summit was busy as always although we did manage to get on top of the cairn briefly for a photo.  It was pretty windy by this time but we found shelter below the cairn to activate the summit.  Again we could hear people on S20 so worked directly through the whip antenna.  We made eleven contacts before stopping to enjoy lunch before setting off down towards Yr Aran

GW/NW-001 Log

GW/NW-019, Yr Aran – 747m, 6 Points

From Snowdon summit we headed southwest down to Bwlch Main.  This is a superb ridge walk which makes a fitting exit from the lofty height of Yr Wyddfa.  At Bwlch Cwm Llan the main path turns left heading back towards the Watkins but we pressed on south towards Yr Aran summit.  There is a path of sorts following the line of the wall.  As nothing is marked on the map we turned right at the 90 degree bend in the wall and headed cross country on a bearing for the summit.  This is quite a difficult and steep route in the wet and windy conditions, not to be recommended.  Instead follow the wall along to the boundary and there is a path up to the summit from there.

We reached the top with less than an hour of daylight remaining so tried once more to quickly activate the summit from the whip but despite calling repeatedly could hear no one.  With the light fading fast we decided to set up the beam in a desperate attempt to get the points before it was too dark to descend.  At this point we didn’t know there was a usable path back down and had visions of either trying to descend the route we came up or spending the night on the summit, neither particularly appealing options.

With the beam up we at last managed to make about six contacts. Unfortunately we had logging issues and lost the details of the first few contacts we made so if I missed you then sorry, please let me know and I will add you to my log.

GW/NW-019 Log

Leaving the summit of Yr Aran the light was fading fast so we followed the only path down we could see as we didn’t want to try descending the route we came up by.   The original plan had been to exit to the east following the high ground as far as possible before descending back down to the Watkins somewhere around the old incline, but without any path marked on the map attempting this in the dark did not seem like such a good option.  Instead we opted to retrace our route back down the northern path and onto the main valley route east.  Quite a bit longer but much safer.

Journey Details

Date – 1st December 2018

Postcode – LL55 4NR

Parking – SH 628 507

Radio – Kenwood TH-D74

Antenna – 2 Ele Yagi + Nagoya NA771

Band – 144 FM

Contacts – 4 + 11 + 4

SOTA points – 8 + 10 + 6 + 9 bonus

Group – Myself & Peter

Walking Route Summary

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Helada 2018

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EA5/AT-038 – Helada

EA5/AT-002 – Puig Campana in the distance behind Benidorm centre

A family holiday in Benidorm afforded the chance to have a go at a Spanish SOTA summit.  We had a week booked on a package trip so luggage allowances meant there was no chance of taking much kit.  I managed to squeeze in my usual Kenwood TH-D74 radio as well as a reduced version of my 2 element beam that I normally use for UK activations.  It would have to do.  There are quite a few summits around Benidorm and a fairly good bus service so there are a number options available if you have time to explore.  I chose Helada because it is within walking distance of the hotel we were in.

Maps

Maps are a problem.  I printed a few location maps from Google before I left so I could find the start of the trails, thinking I would buy a detailed walking map locally once we arrived.  That was a big mistake.  The family were happy to have a day out walking around the shops of Benidorm whilst I searched for maps. There are no outdoors/walking shops in Benidorm and only one book shop which does not sell maps.  The place is totally focused on tourists sitting on the beach and the shops reflect this.  To walk any of the more remote hills I would certainly recommend buying your maps before you leave.

Track log shown on Google Earth

There is a leaflet available from the tourist information that describes the walk along Sierra Helada but it is not very good.  I studied it for ages the evening before but couldn’t work out the route they were suggesting.

Finding the trail

The main road parallel to the beach in the Easern end of Benidorm is called Avenue Del Mediterraneo.  Find this and follow it to the Eastern end.  From there head up Calle de Berlin by now heading SE.  Turn right at the end of this onto Calle Sierra Dorada.

The Cross

At the roundabout take the right fork onto Av. Tokio.  Follow this street up to the cross.  It is a popular walk up to the cross and can be driven almost to the top.  As you gain height the views over the city are worth enjoying.

 

Sierra Cortina and EA5/AT-096 – Alt de Cortina just behind the city in the foreground with EA5/AT-002 – Puig Campana looming behind.

As you leave the tarmac behind at the cross, the left fork is the start of the trail.  The right path leads a short distance up to the cross itself and there is a path back down which rejoins our trail if you want to pop up to see it.

The trail

The trail from the Cross is fairly obvious most of the way, it is marked in various places with painted ticks, a few cairns and the odd signpost.  Once you reach the first summit just follow the cliff edge until you can see the radio towers.  It’s a bit up and down as you would expect from a coastal cliff path.

Operating in Spain

Radio masts on top

I only had vhf/uhf FM capability on my radio so I knew it was not going to be easy activating a summit.  I spent as much time as possible in the days before listening to the local repeater and on S20 the VHF calling channel.  In four days I never herd a single person on either.  There did seem to be some APRS activity locally but from the hotel I couldn’t reach anything that would gate my packets to the internet.

The top

From the higher ground near the Cross and most of the way along the ridge I was able to get APRS packets through to EI5RCI-15 NW of Alicante.  After a good walk and a lot of up and down I eventually reached the summit where there is a large radio mast installation.  I set up only about ten metres from the perimeter fence but it didn’t seem to cause me any interference  problems. I knew from previous discussions that I would be more likely to succeed if I new a little Spanish so I was prepared with a few key phrases thanks to Ignacio EA2BD.  I am sure my accent would have been a give away but I called CQ SOTA for about nearly an hour from the top without a single reply.

Key Phrases

CQ SOTA CQ SOTA Echo Alfa barra Mike Uno Charlie Julliet Eco , QRZ
Tu senial es cinco nueve, cambio
Mi referencia es SOTA EA5/AT cero tres ocho. OK!
Gracias por el contacto, siete tres

Eventually I gave up and packed the station away for the return trip.  The activation was unsuccessful but it didn’t matter as the day out in the hills was more than worth it.

Overall I would definitely recommend this walk but for a successful activation I think you would need to plan on taking HF bands or a few friends with licences.

73, Andrew

Journey Details

Date – 31st October 2018

Radio – Kenwood TH-D74

Antenna – 2 Ele Yagi

Band – 144 FM

Contacts – 0

SOTA points – 0

Group – Myself

Walking Route Summary

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Carn Mor Dearg & Ben Nevis 2018

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A forecast break in the Scottish weather coinciding with a rare free weekend afforded the perfect opportunity to bag two of the highest SOTA summits in the Kingdom and also a chance to tackle the impressive CMD arete.  I headed off up the motorway on the Friday morning looking forward to a weekend of adventure.  I was not disappointed.

There are two obvious option for this route, either starting at the North Face car park, or from the tourist car park in Glen Nevis.  The North Face start is probably a more pleasant walk in and perhaps a little easier, but as I was planning to activate two summits I couldn’t be sure how late I would be coming back down.  I chose the Glen Nevis start as it would be an easier return route in the dark.

GM/WS-003 – Carn Mor Dearg

View over the Loch at breakfast

I was first one down for breakfast on Saturday morning for the earliest possible start, it was not too far to the car park so I was on the hill by 8:30am.

The initial trek up the tourist path was not as bad as I was expecting, it was busy but most people were very considerate and quite happy to move over and let me pass.  On reaching the junction at Lochan Meall an t-Suidhe I turned off the main path heading North.  This path leads around the North side of the Ben below castle ridge and around to the CIC hut.  After the melee of the tourist path earlier the solitude was most welcome.  I passed one other walker doing the same route as me but the other way around.

On reaching the hut there is a fairly easy river crossing to reach the slopes of Carn Dearg Meadhonach.  I had read some reports that indicated that there may be a path up here somewhere, but if there is then I didn’t find it.  The slope is steep but not too steep, it’s mostly loose rocky ground interspersed with grassy heather, so easy enough to pick a route up it if taken with care.

Carn Dearg Meadhonach with CMD in the background

On reaching the summit of Carn Dearg Meadhonach (not a SOTA summit) I turned South for a welcome and mush easier traverse down and then up again  to Carn Mor Dearg.

Carn Mor Dearg summit

Carn Mor Dearg summit was in the cloud when I arrived so not much to see.  I soon set up the station beside the summit cairn and called CQ SOTA.  I was soon rewarded with seven contacts including two summit-to-summit contacts.  The temperature at the summit was below freezing and although not excessively windy I would estimate the wind chill at around -15 deg judging by how cold my fingers were holding the mic.

GM/WS-003 -Log

By the time I had packed up to leave the weather was starting to improve and I was able to catch a few glimpses of the CMD itself appearing from the mist.

I set off along the ridge, it deserves it’s reputation!  I was fortunate that there was not too much wind so I was able to stay on the very top almost all the way along.  At times it really does define what a ‘knife edge’ ridge should be.  The ridge proper extends for more than a kilometre until it reaches the SE slope of the Ben.  The end of the ridge is marked by a cairn which also marks the last escape route to the North down Coire Leis.  From here it is a relentless slog up to the summit of Ben Nevis itself.

GM/WS-001 – Ben Nevis

The top

There is a path shown on the map indicating the climb up Ben Nevis from the CMD.  Don’t believe it, the route is up a mighty great pile of loose rock, there is no clear path most of the way, just keep heading up until the slope eases off and you see the welcome sight of the summit structures appearing out of the mist.

It was not as busy as I expected at the top, I guess many of those who set out in the morning didn’t make it all the way up but still there were a fair few people around. I picked a spot away from the main structures and set up the station.  I soon had another seven contacts in the log.

GM/WS-001 -Log

As I was packing away the wind started to pick up and the snow came down almost into blizzard conditions.  The route back from the summit to the zig zags is notorious in poor visibility as there are a couple of spots where the path passes very close to an almost vertical gully drop.  Every year the odd person disappears over this edge to their doom.  Fortunately the route was clear enough and the drop easily avoided.  Once onto the zig zags most of the drama is over, just follow the path back down to the car park.  As I descended the weather improved until by the bottom it was clear and sunny.

Journey Details

Date – 6th October 2018

Postcode – PH33 6PF

Parking – NN 122 730

Radio – Kenwood TH-D74

Antenna – 2 Ele Yagi

Band – 144 FM

Contacts – 6 + 7

SOTA points – 10 + 10

Group – Myself

Walking Route Summary

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Mynydd Machen 2018

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GW/SW-030 – Mynydd Machen

A trip over to South Wales for work offered the opportunity to bag a few of the lower Welsh one pointers.  There is a good approach to Mynydd Machen from the North West along the service track for the radio tower located on the summit.  I parked the car on the road ST 215 907 where there is just room to squeeze one car onto the verge.  The track has a gate but it doesn’t look like it is used and whilst I was there a dog walker turned up and drove straight up the track to park about half way along.  The first 300m or so of the track are in good condition and there are plenty of spots along the verge where you could leave a car.  Beyond this the track is a bit rougher but still passable all the way to the top.

At the top there is a trig point located a reasonable distance from the radio tower but close enough so that I was still getting de-sense on the radio.

As I arrived at the summit I could hear people on the calling channel just using the Nagoya on the HT.  Whilst stood there I made five contacts, including two summit to summits before I had even taken off my rucksack, so with this one in the bag I decided to press onto the next one rather than stopping to set up properly.

Journey Details

Date – 30th August 2018

Postcode – NP11 7PS

Parking – ST 215 907

Radio – Kenwood TH-D74

Antenna – Nagoya NA771

Band – 144 FM

Contacts – 5

SOTA points – 1

Group – Myself

GW/SW-030 Log

Walking Route Summary

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Mynydd y Lan 2018

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GW/SW-024 – Mynydd y Lan

A short drive from Mynydd Machen got me to Mynydd y Lan.  There are a number of possible approaches to this summit.  I opted to come in from the North West as there appeared on the map to be a track most of the way.

There is room on the verge to park one car at ST 194 932.  The track is not as well defined as the map would suggest but it is there if you look carefully, at least as far as the farm at Ton-eithin.  Beyond this, once onto the access land, the whole area was covered in fern obscuring any track.  Fortunately there are sheep there doing a good job of keeping a path open through the ferns so I was able to follow their path around to the summit.

The top is very flat and open with no immediately obvious summit at the point indicated by the SOTA database.  This point is some 200m South of the point indicated on the map, it’s all in the activation zone so I guess it doesn’t really matter where you choose.  I managed to find a marker stone about 50m E of the SOTA point and 150m SSE from the map summit mark.  I don’t know what the stone is there for but it seemed a reasonable spot to operate from and should be easily found again.  There are radio towers both to the North and to the South of the summit but they are far enough away to not be a problem.  I set up the station, the stone made a good anchor for the antenna pole.  I soon had enough contacts in the log including MW6BWA again summit to summit and also MW0JLA summit to summit.  I also managed to log Alan GW6VPX again on his way back down Pen y Fan.  The return to the car is uneventful, just follow the same route back again.

GW/SW-024 Log

Journey Details

Date – 30th August 2018

Postcode – NP11 7BB

Parking – ST 194 932

Radio – Kenwood TH-D74 + 50W PA

Antenna – 2 ele yagi

Band – 144 FM

Contacts – 5

SOTA points – 1

Group – Myself

Walking Route Summary

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Mynydd Twyn-glas 2018

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GW/SW-019 – Mynydd Twyn-glas

Another short drive got me to the parking for Mynydd Twyn-glas at ST 236 980.  There is plenty of room here for half a dozen cars and a good track directly to the summit.  The track heads off to the East ascending gently, past the radio towers and onto the trig point just beyond.  It is an uneventful walk along a very obvious track.

The radio towers are far enough away from the trig point to not cause any problems.  Arriving at the summit I soon set up the station and managed six contacts.

Whilst there if the weather is clear it is worth enjoying the superb views out across the Severn estuary.

The return to the car was about as eventful as the walk in, which was welcome after successfully activating three summits in an afternoon.

GW/SW-019 Log

Journey Details

Date – 30th August 2018

Postcode – NP11 5AY

Parking – ST 236 980

Radio – Kenwood TH-D74 + 50W PA

Antenna – 2 ele yagi

Band – 144 FM

Contacts – 6

SOTA points – 1

Group – Myself

Walking Route Summary

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Brown Willy 2018

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G/DC-002 – The Long Way Round

On the Sunday I decided to have a go at Brown Willy up on Bodmin Moor.  Initially I planned to tackle it from the South following G4OBKs 2015 route.  I plugged the postcode into the satnav and set off to find the parking spot.  As soon as I got away from the coast and gained some height around St Austel I was into thick fog.  Approaching the parking spot from the South West the postcode I had took me along the A30, straight past the planned start and onto the next turning beyond.

As this was beyond the edge of my map I struggled to find the correct parking and start but eventually found what I thought must be it.  I parked the car and prepared to kit up for the days walk but immediately realised that I had forgotten to load my walking boots. Doh..

I set off anyway in my trainers but pretty soon realised things were not right.  Fortunately I soon came across a path closure notice with a location map and from this I worked out that I was definitely in the wrong place.  At this point I got the message that this was not to be so turned around and headed back to the car.  Fortunately I had also brought maps and a postcode for the Northerly approach as an alternative option so I plugged this into the satnav which said it was only about five miles away, I decided having got this far I may as well at least have a look at it. Shortly after I started driving the satnav changed it’s mind and told me it was actually about 20 miles away.  Ah well, at least the scenery would be pleasant if only the fog would lift!

Parking on the Northern approach is great.  There is a proper car park with room for about 50 cars located at SX 138 819.  From here there is a good track for a little way and on a clear day I think it would be possible to follow the track all the way to the summit, but with the thick fog I was unable to see where the track led at each twist and turn and as the track is not marked on the map I was forced to navigate by compass alone.

I took a fairly straight line towards the summit which was a mistake.  Reaching the river at SX 153 806 it was easy enough to cross but the ground on the other side is very difficult.  There is a proper crossing a little to the South which is what I should have headed for.  From that crossing there is a good path up to the summit which I followed on the way back down.

Reaching the summit eventually, still in thick fog, the wind was strong over the summit making setup difficult.  The aerial ended up pointing down under more than to the North East where I wanted it.

It took me a while to get the contacts, radio amateurs are sparse down in these parts, but I did eventually get the four I needed before packing up and returning to the car. On the return journey I followed the track down to the river crossing and managed to pick out the path back to the car park in the fog, a much easier route than the one I came in on.

It’s when you have a day like this that the planning and preparation pays off, and being willing to say no and turn back shows it’s importance.  The hill will still be there for another attempt on another day, make sure you are as well.  Be safe!

Journey Details

Date – 19th August 2018

Postcode – PL32 9QG

Parking – SX 138 819

Radio – Kenwood TH-D74 + 50W PA on 2m

Antenna – 2 ele yagi

Band – 144 FM

Contacts – 4

SOTA points – 1

Group – Myself

G/DC-002 Log

Walking Route Summary

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High Willhays 2018

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G/DC-001 – Devon High Point

After Christ Cross in the morning we wound our way along the minor roads onto Dartmoor for the main dish of the day, High Willhays.

Following M0BLF’s excellent instructions from his blog, we arrived at the parking spot without any problems (although his coordinates are slightly out, the parking is at SX 590 912).  With the extra height gained we were walking in cloud but there is a clear track all the way up so navigation was not a problem.  The cloud did lift later in the day for the return to the car.

I set the station up on the pile of rocks on the top of the Tor and soon enough had four contacts, although again once I had the four required there was no-one else waiting to claim the points so we packed up and headed back down to the car.  By this time the cloud had lifted a bit and we enjoyed a few glimpses into the distance.

Journey Details

Date – 18th August 2018

Postcode – EX20 1QP

Parking – SX 590 912

Radio – Kenwood TH-D74 + 50W PA on 2m

Antenna – 2 ele yagi

Band – 144 FM

Contacts – 4

SOTA points – 4

Group – Myself, Belinda & Jacob

G/DC-001 Log

Walking Route Summary

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Christ Cross 2018

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G/DC-005 – Passing Pleasure

A family holiday down to Cornwall afforded the opportunity to bag a few new summits.  We stayed the night in Cullompton which meant we could avoid the Saturday morning traffic on the M5 and get an early start onto our first summit at Christ Cross.

There is space for one car on the side of the road at SS 965 050 just South of the junction.  It’s a short walk up the track to the summit.  There is no right of way over the track so you may need to seek permission for access.

There is plenty of room beside the radio mast to set up the antenna and if it’s a clear day there is a great view to enjoy whilst setting up.

We soon had four contacts in the log to qualify the summit, the fourth contact was remarkably into France with Alain down in Brittany.  Having made the contact Belinda took the opportunity to have a QSO with Alain as part of her Foundation training practical.  After this high point I called a few more times but was unable to raise any further contacts to we packed up and headed off to the next summit.

Journey Details

Date – 18th August 2018

Postcode – EX5 4HF or EX5 4LY

Parking – SS 965 050

Radio – Kenwood TH-D74 + 50W PA on 2m

Antenna – 2 ele yagi

Band – 144 FM

Contacts – 4

SOTA points – 1

Group – Myself, Belinda & Jacob

G/DC-005 Log

Walking Route Summary

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